August 19, 2018, 02:51:38 AM

Author Topic: Yankee Roodle Dandy?  (Read 13414 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

July 03, 2018, 03:24:52 AM
Reply #300
Offline

brap2

NSNO Subscriber
I’ll be honest, it’s a big plus in Brands / Silva’s book for me.

Absolutely no regard for ego, reputation, even the idea the club thought the ‘fans want him to stay’ - they’ve said nah fuck that he doesn’t fit the bill.

Superb, I cannot wait to see what they do with that doh.
I knew that someday I was going to die, and I knew that before I died, two things would happen to me. That number one; I would regret my entire life, and number two; that I would want to live my life over again.


July 03, 2018, 06:09:07 AM
Reply #301
Offline

blargins

NSNO Subscriber
It’s called karma.
"I wouldn't be up here if I hadn't failed a million times." Nick Foles

July 03, 2018, 01:33:52 PM
Reply #302
Offline

Macca77


Moshiri wanted him off the wage bill, it's not really a secret is it


July 05, 2018, 08:54:39 AM
Reply #303
Offline

Robber Rodwell


https://www.theguardian.com/football/2018/jul/03/wayne-rooney-dc-united-signing-mls-soccer

Great article.. Sums up DC United.  I have never been able to get into the MLS personally.  Maybe the break from the UK will be beneficial for his family life.  There is no way he will honor his full contract out here though.

July 05, 2018, 10:07:39 AM
Reply #304
Offline

blargins

NSNO Subscriber
https://www.theguardian.com/football/2018/jul/03/wayne-rooney-dc-united-signing-mls-soccer

Great article.. Sums up DC United.  I have never been able to get into the MLS personally.  Maybe the break from the UK will be beneficial for his family life.  There is no way he will honor his full contract out here though.
Not many know who he is here either. Beckham obviously because he has the looks plus his wife is famous whereas Rooney’s wife isn’t.

I think even Ibrahimovich wasn’t that well known but he got a boost by being on one of the late night tv shows recently. Colbert I think it was. Can’t remember.

I can’t get into the mls either. I look out for Unions scores and follow them on Facebook so always see their goals and an occasional win. No clue where they are on the table though. Probably near the bottom I’d guess.
"I wouldn't be up here if I hadn't failed a million times." Nick Foles

July 05, 2018, 11:39:03 AM
Reply #305
Offline

howard1334


Not many know who he is here either. Beckham obviously because he has the looks plus his wife is famous whereas Rooney’s wife isn’t.

I think even Ibrahimovich wasn’t that well known but he got a boost by being on one of the late night tv shows recently. Colbert I think it was. Can’t remember.

I can’t get into the mls either. I look out for Unions scores and follow them on Facebook so always see their goals and an occasional win. No clue where they are on the table though. Probably near the bottom I’d guess.

That Guardian article is a bit of an MLS hit piece -- what did the author suspect to find from a survey of people at a baseball game? In my view, it reflects the naivety with which Europeans (including Brits in that) typically view both MLS and U.S. soccer culture, including many Europeans that have spent time in the United States.

First, people tend to forget just how huge and diverse the USA is, and thus fail to realize that while some parts of the country care little for soccer, others are soccer crazy (see, e.g., LA, NYC, Seattle, and Atlanta). Further, Europeans tend to look down on MLS with unwarranted disdain, writing it off as a "retirement league." Relative to other pro sports leagues in the USA and other soccer leagues abroad, it is still pretty young (MLS's inaugural season was in 1996), but it already competes with many leagues in Europe, both with respect to attendance and talent. MLS already has the third highest average attendance of all USA pro sports leagues (trailing only NFL and MLB), and it has the seventh highest average attendance of all soccer leagues -- a stat that I suspect will surprise many of you on here. Moreover, the US is increasingly attracting high caliber players -- including both vets of the top five leagues in Europe and emerging talents from Central and South America -- and they are now joining the league while still in their prime. Giovinco, Giovanni Dos Santos, Maximiliano Moralez, and David Villa* are some examples of such talents, but there are loads of others now too. Indeed, 19 MLS players featured on World Cup squads this year -- including for the likes of Egypt, Sweden, Mexico, and Peru -- a stat made all the more remarkable by the United States failure to qualify. And even MLS squad players frequently have top five league pedigree now. Also telling is the relative failure of a lot of top European talents in MLS during recent seasons -- including the likes of Pirlo, Kaka, Lampard, and, especially, Gerrard -- showing that even formerly world class players can't just expect to show up in MLS and dominate anymore.

Recently, I have started going to NYC FC matches, and I have really enjoyed them for the most part. NYC FC's fan base is pretty rabid and their games fast-paced and exciting. While I doubt I will ever come to support an MLS team as much as I do Everton, there is no question that the league is only getting better, and I suspect that its talent level will rival the likes of all but the top five leagues in Europe within the next decade. It is already arguably the equal of Liga MX (just look at the CONCACAF Championship results this year), a league even most Europeans would concede is decent.

Also, @blargins, where do you live in the USA? In NYC, tons of people know who Ibrahimovic and Rooney are. And nearly every single bar has been packed for each and every World Cup match.

*Yes, Villa was 33 when he arrived, but he had scored 13 in La Liga the previous season for Atletico, and there is little question he could still play at that level for a year or two.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2018, 04:38:15 PM by howard1334 »


July 05, 2018, 05:52:20 PM
Reply #306
Offline

blargins

NSNO Subscriber
That Guardian article is a bit of an MLS hit piece -- what did the author suspect to find from a survey of people at a baseball game? In my view, it reflects the naivety with which Europeans (including Brits in that) typically view both MLS and U.S. soccer culture, including many Europeans that have spent time in the United States.

First, people tend to forget just how huge and diverse the USA is, and thus fail to realize that while some parts of the country care little for soccer, others are soccer crazy (see, e.g., LA, NYC, Seattle, and Atlanta). Further, Europeans tend to look down on MLS with unwarranted disdain, writing it off as a "retirement league." Relative to other pro sports leagues in the USA and other soccer leagues abroad, it is still pretty young (MLS's inaugural season was in 1996), but it already competes with many leagues in Europe, both with respect to attendance and talent. MLS already has the third highest average attendance of all USA pro sports leagues (trailing only NFL and MLB), and it has the seventh highest average attendance of all soccer leagues -- a stat that I suspect will surprise many of you on here. Moreover, the US is increasingly attracting high caliber players -- including both vets of the top five leagues in Europe and emerging talents from Central and South America -- and they are now joining the league while still in their prime. Giovinco, Giovanni Dos Santos, Maximiliano Moralez, and David Villa* are some examples of such talents, but there are loads of others now too. Indeed, 19 MLS players featured on World Cup squads this year -- including for the likes of Egypt, Sweden, Mexico, and Peru -- a stat made all the more remarkable by the United States failure to qualify. And even MLS squad players frequently have top five league pedigree now. Also telling is the relative failure of a lot of top European talents in MLS during recent seasons -- including the likes of Pirlo, Kaka, Lampard, and, especially, Gerrard -- showing that even formerly world class players can't just expect to show up in MLS and dominate anymore.

Recently, I have started going to NYC FC matches, and I have really enjoyed them for the most part. NYC FC's fan base is pretty rabid and their games fast-paced and exciting. While I doubt I will ever come to support an MLS team as much as I do Everton, there is no question that the league is only getting better, and I suspect that its talent level will rival the likes of all but the top five leagues in Europe within the next decade. It is already arguably the equal of Liga MX (just look at the CONCACAF Championship results this year), a league even most Europeans would concede is decent.

Also, @blargins, where do you live in the USA? In NYC, tons of people know who Ibrahimovic and Rooney are. And nearly every single bar has been packed for each and every World Cup match.

*Yes, Villa was 33 when he arrived, but he had scored 13 in La Liga the previous season for Atletico, and there is little question he could still play at that level for a year or two.

Good post. I'm in south Jersey, I'm 35 minutes from Philadelphia. There's a lot of Union fans around where I live, and I have no doubt they all know who Rooney is. Lots of my friends follow the prem too (many are rs fans unfortunately).

Away from that, of course most people around here align themselves with the Philly teams, the Eagles, Phillies, 76ers and the Flyers, but I've found it's only the die hards who will include the Union in that as well. Perhaps because the Union is still relatively new and still establishing itself. As well as being pretty crap, but Philly fans have been used to that for years (excluding this years Superbowl of course).

You're probably right, it is regional and it doesn't surprise me the attendances the MLS is getting. The US has a huge population and with soccer the most popular youth sport for years, it's going to filter through professionally too.

But pretty much everyone in England knows who Michael Jordan is or who Lebron James is. Wayne Rooney in the US, I don't think so much. He doesn't have the branding around him like Beckham does.
"I wouldn't be up here if I hadn't failed a million times." Nick Foles

July 05, 2018, 08:33:19 PM
Reply #307
Offline

Evertonian in NC


I would still posit that most American footy fans tend to follow a European side, 90% of the time an EPL side.  And watch European leagues, because that is the best footy.  There are certain local "hotspots" where the local MLS side has a rabid following, and it has been successfully branded as a social event in places like Portland and Seattle, etc.
"If you want a really scary thought, imagine how stupid the average American is.  Then realize...half of 'em are dumber than THAT." - George Carlin