November 19, 2017, 05:34:58 AM

Author Topic: Should we sack Steve Walsh?  (Read 9168 times)

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October 27, 2017, 03:46:48 PM
Reply #120
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GrantyBoy78


Articles are there to sell papers and create discussion. It may even be a bit of subtle game play on Koeman's part to leak details to try and salvage his reputation for his next position.

Of course we didn't have a great window but over 50% of the signings I would imagine were Koeman's and how he utilised them was poor in the extreme.
Be interesting if we scrap his role if we do let him go or persist with a DoF.

deCoubertin

October 27, 2017, 03:51:26 PM
Reply #121
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sirblue57


Said it before. Moyes or whoever he had in his tenure deserves a look for the DoF role. Unearthed some gems in his time here.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2017, 04:32:26 PM by sirblue57 »
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October 27, 2017, 04:03:06 PM
Reply #122
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GrantyBoy78


Having a high-profile manager and a lesser know, sycophantic DoF who’s just grateful to be there, wasn’t the best pairing. The manager should be accountable to the DoF and the DoF should be a big enough personality to tell the manager where to go if he suggests signing of the Martina standard.


October 27, 2017, 04:13:19 PM
Reply #123
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bigmanbob


Someone provide me with a good example where a DOF has worked in the Prem

October 27, 2017, 04:18:28 PM
Reply #124
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Waltzer


Someone provide me with a good example where a DOF has worked in the Prem

Southampton, amazingly well.

October 27, 2017, 04:21:49 PM
Reply #125
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Lxxx


The DoF has to have the unequivocal backing of the board for it to work. I don't think there is an issue with one in the English game as such, it's just a cultural legacy that the old school manager's don't like to relinquish responsibility. A lot of the younger manager's probably wouldn't have an issue with it at all, in fact they would probably welcome someone else dealing with a lot of the administration side of things.


October 27, 2017, 04:28:09 PM
Reply #126
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Major Clanger


The DoF has to have the unequivocal backing of the board for it to work. I don't think there is an issue with one in the English game as such, it's just a cultural legacy that the old school manager's don't like to relinquish responsibility. A lot of the younger manager's probably wouldn't have an issue with it at all, in fact they would probably welcome someone else dealing with a lot of the administration side of things.

Also if you look at the boards, they're mostly amateurs who may be ruthless businessmen in their original area, but turn into starstruck schoolboys when it comes to football.
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October 27, 2017, 04:28:23 PM
Reply #127
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Waltzer


The DoF has to have the unequivocal backing of the board for it to work. I don't think there is an issue with one in the English game as such, it's just a cultural legacy that the old school manager's don't like to relinquish responsibility. A lot of the younger manager's probably wouldn't have an issue with it at all, in fact they would probably welcome someone else dealing with a lot of the administration side of things.

I agree and I dont think Koeman particularly had an issue with it, I just dont think Walsh was strong enough to deal with him

October 27, 2017, 04:45:33 PM
Reply #128
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Lxxx


I agree and I dont think Koeman particularly had an issue with it, I just dont think Walsh was strong enough to deal with him

The fact they both joined the club at the same time led to the strange dynamic. Walsh was learning about the club, his new role and what was expected of him and Koeman's strength of personality and obvious backing from Moshiri wouldn't have led to a straightforward relationship. I can well see him acquiescing to Koeman during this period.

In my opinion Walsh will probably be wiser in the role now, will have had his authority respected with this managerial change and we should now see more of a better balance with the new manager. I think his role is vital really and it'd be silly to even think of changing him in the near future.

October 27, 2017, 04:55:26 PM
Reply #129
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Toddacelli


The fact they both joined the club at the same time led to the strange dynamic. Walsh was learning about the club, his new role and what was expected of him and Koeman's strength of personality and obvious backing from Moshiri wouldn't have led to a straightforward relationship. I can well see him acquiescing to Koeman during this period.

In my opinion Walsh will probably be wiser in the role now, will have had his authority respected with this managerial change and we should now see more of a better balance with the new manager. I think his role is vital really and it'd be silly to even think of changing him in the near future.

Agree with this. I don't understand a lot about how these relationships work, but the DoF has got to be the big kahuna and take responsibility on behalf of the club if the manager is straying form the board's vision of where the club needs to be headed.

Walsh being established now, any new managers should be easier to keep in line.
    

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October 27, 2017, 05:33:33 PM
Reply #130
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Makis


Someone provide me with a good example where a DOF has worked in the Prem
Premier League isn't exactly a good example of forward thinking. Took foreign coaches to even get the players into the same shape as their colleagues in the mainland.

October 27, 2017, 05:42:31 PM
Reply #131
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Rodenplav64


I just can't believe Koeman had fuck all to do with signings . Given that they look good ( if a little overpriced in some cases ) on paper then maybe we should wait and see what tune a new Manager gets out of them before sacking Walsh . Martina and Williams are the exceptions and they were both firmly on Koeman I think .

October 27, 2017, 05:55:19 PM
Reply #132
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van der Meyde


The fact they both joined the club at the same time led to the strange dynamic.
I think there are probably parallels to when Ferguson and Gill both left Man Utd at the same time too.

In hindsight, having both a new manager and a Director of Football, both with little experience of conducting transfers, was a disaster waiting to happen. As @Rhys suggested the other day, with a more experienced DoF the dynamic might have been a lot more successful.
...

October 27, 2017, 06:06:20 PM
Reply #133
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Lxxx


I think there are probably parallels to when Ferguson and Gill both left Man Utd at the same time too.

In hindsight, having both a new manager and a Director of Football, both with little experience of conducting transfers, was a disaster waiting to happen. As @Rhys suggested the other day, with a more experienced DoF the dynamic might have been a lot more successful.

Even a vastly experienced DoF starting a new job at the same time as a new manager with Koeman's strong personality would have caused issues. It was just unfortunate timing as they both will have wanted to establish their own power base at the same time. Should have been half-expected really, especially with Moshiri's comment of 'Koeman is Koeman, he does what he wants and I support him.' Starstruck much!

October 27, 2017, 06:41:39 PM
Reply #134
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BlueForYou


I have only just realised that this Steve Walsh is not the Steve Walsh(hard bastard!) that played for Leicester!

Our Steve Walsh is very close to and by all accounts has a good understanding with Nigel Pearson(another tough bastard!), whom he had worked with for many years

Pearson? Now there's a thought...................... .....!
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