February 19, 2020, 05:05:15 PM

Author Topic: Sidibe  (Read 8173 times)

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November 19, 2019, 03:28:53 PM
Reply #105
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Escla

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Still so foreign to me, no pun intended. I've only visited London (3x), and only been to Oxfordshire twice for a client. Outside of the UK, I've only been to Germany, and you know they have a bunch of big, modern cities too. But nowhere else. Obviously the U.S. is huge by comparison, but most individual states have a big, cosmopolitan city if not more than 1.

Germany has a lot of big modern cities because we bombed the hell out of their big old cities during WW2.


November 19, 2019, 03:34:52 PM
Reply #106
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Jimmywhack

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Germany has a lot of big modern cities because we bombed the hell out of their big old cities during WW2.
Another reason why Manchester comes across as more modern, the IRA bombing in the 90s
Simply simply lovely

November 19, 2019, 03:51:41 PM
Reply #107
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Escla

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Another reason why Manchester comes across as more modern, the IRA bombing in the 90s

As atrocious as that bombing was and I don’t mean to trivialise it but it was one incident with no fatalities,
the allied bombing of Germany killed 410,000 civilians and flattened cities like Hamburg, Berlin, Dresden, Frankfurt, Cologne.


November 19, 2019, 04:12:54 PM
Reply #108
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Tinga



November 19, 2019, 04:14:00 PM
Reply #109
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Bluedylan


He's allowed to have an opinion.

It may not compare to Monaco but I doubt he realises that Liverpool is actually one of the best cities in the country.

Think it's the 5th biggest City,.
''In the words of the prophet, today you sell your ring, tomorrow your watch, next week your chain and in 77 days, you won't have eyes to cry with''

Accattone - Pier Paolo Pasolini.

November 19, 2019, 04:15:41 PM
Reply #110
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Bluedylan


Personally, think he's a bit of a cheeky fucker saying that. Even if you think it, don't say it. Bit disrespectful in my eyes.
''In the words of the prophet, today you sell your ring, tomorrow your watch, next week your chain and in 77 days, you won't have eyes to cry with''

Accattone - Pier Paolo Pasolini.


November 19, 2019, 04:20:29 PM
Reply #111
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Escla

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I don’t know how good/bad his English is but it’s not his mother tongue so who knows what he meant by a “sad city” it’s a strange way of describing a city ?

November 19, 2019, 04:23:19 PM
Reply #112
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Waltzer


I don't know how good/bad his English is but it's not his mother tongue so who knows what he meant by a "sad city” it's a strange way of describing a city ?
It was from his interview with L’Est Éclair in France

Sent from my CLT-L09 using NSNO Everton Forums mobile app


November 19, 2019, 04:25:13 PM
Reply #113
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Bluedylan


I don’t know how good/bad his English is but it’s not his mother tongue so who knows what he meant by a “sad city” it’s a strange way of describing a city ?

I have heard that kind of comment about Liverpool before (from people not from the city). I think the main thrust of the idea being that it's seen it's best days and there's a certain faded glory/sadness to it.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2019, 04:26:51 PM by Bluedylan »
''In the words of the prophet, today you sell your ring, tomorrow your watch, next week your chain and in 77 days, you won't have eyes to cry with''

Accattone - Pier Paolo Pasolini.

November 19, 2019, 04:25:47 PM
Reply #114
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Escla

NSNO Subscriber
It was from his interview with L’Est Éclair in France

Sent from my CLT-L09 using NSNO Everton Forums mobile app
Ah, didn't know that, so it depends I guess on what French word he used and who translated it ?

November 19, 2019, 04:29:36 PM
Reply #115
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Alanvideo


I don’t know how good/bad his English is but it’s not his mother tongue so who knows what he meant by a “sad city” it’s a strange way of describing a city ?
...........................perhaps he means depressed - which it certainly is not - or means it has a painful past ,which is somewhat true.
When i first came to Liverpool 50 years ago it looked as if the war had ended the day before. The city was still littered with bomb sites and all the buildings were black with soot.
Nowadays the city centre is clean and vibrant with a good mix of old and new architecture. But Sid has probably not taken the time to explore. 
We are special ,we are Everton.

November 19, 2019, 04:38:47 PM
Reply #116
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Escla

NSNO Subscriber
I have heard that kind of comment about Liverpool before (from people not from the city). I think the main thrust of the idea being that it's seen his best days and there's a certain faded glory/sadness to it.

It really depends on the demographic to a great extent, couple of examples, when I get the train up from Euston on match day it never ceases to amaze me how many young people are travelling up to Liverpool for the weekend, from Euston, Birmingham, Milton Keynes, my London based nieces born in Oxfordshire go up about four times a year, say it’s one of the most vibrant cities they know, not just night life but the whole cultural scene, Tate Modern, Maritime museum, Museum of slavery etc. etc. A few of our friends have children born and bred in London/Home counties who go to/have been to Liverpool University, unanimously positive about their entire experience.
Get to my generation, I don’t have a Scouse accent but whenever I announce that I was born and bred in Liverpool the inevitable old cliche’s come out about unemployment, crime and the odd impression of Harry Enfield's two Scousers eh, eh ! It will die out with my generation though if the City continue I the right direction.

November 19, 2019, 04:40:48 PM
Reply #117
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Jimmywhack

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As atrocious as that bombing was and I don’t mean to trivialise it but it was one incident with no fatalities,
the allied bombing of Germany killed 410,000 civilians and flattened cities like Hamburg, Berlin, Dresden, Frankfurt, Cologne.
Dont disagree, just saying that it changed the landscape and look of Manchester
Simply simply lovely

November 19, 2019, 04:50:05 PM
Reply #118
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Bluedylan


It really depends on the demographic to a great extent, couple of examples, when I get the train up from Euston on match day it never ceases to amaze me how many young people are travelling up to Liverpool for the weekend, from Euston, Birmingham, Milton Keynes, my London based nieces born in Oxfordshire go up about four times a year, say it’s one of the most vibrant cities they know, not just night life but the whole cultural scene, Tate Modern, Maritime museum, Museum of slavery etc. etc. A few of our friends have children born and bred in London/Home counties who go to/have been to Liverpool University, unanimously positive about their entire experience.
Get to my generation, I don’t have a Scouse accent but whenever I announce that I was born and bred in Liverpool the inevitable old cliche’s come out about unemployment, crime and the odd impression of Harry Enfield's two Scousers eh, eh ! It will die out with my generation though if the City continue I the right direction.


Yeah, it's not my opinion at all. Town is incredible, genuinely, especially after the European money. Much better than most other city centres, in my opinion. I think it's a common sentiment to view older, industrial cities or major ports as 'sad' in a way, not just in the UK. I personally think there's a melancholy (in a good way) to Liverpool, rather than a sadness.
''In the words of the prophet, today you sell your ring, tomorrow your watch, next week your chain and in 77 days, you won't have eyes to cry with''

Accattone - Pier Paolo Pasolini.

November 19, 2019, 05:06:49 PM
Reply #119
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Escla

NSNO Subscriber
Yeah, it's not my opinion at all. Town is incredible, genuinely, especially after the European money. Much better than most other city centres, in my opinion. I think it's a common sentiment to view older, industrial cities or major ports as 'sad' in a way, not just in the UK. I personally think there's a melancholy (in a good way) to Liverpool, rather than a sadness.

The French word “Melancolie” can be translated as sad/sadness. (Not being smart ass, googled it)