October 30, 2020, 02:23:52 AM

Author Topic: Deadwood Left  (Read 5526 times)

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October 07, 2020, 02:45:55 AM
Reply #60
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Toddacelli


Honestly, no clue how that all works. It's got to be a flat fee, maybe with built-in step-ups based on x, y, or z? That would make sense but I'm still guessing. I highly doubt Cazoo had anything to do with any of the advertising/marketing. That's the marketing dept. who has their own budget (if we're at all run like a normal business).

Again, pretty speculative, but I'm very confident this is the case.

A kit sponsor will offer an amount because they know that we will provide a certain amount of exposure.

Throughout the year the marketing dept will be compiling a portfolio of exposure with metrics of TV views, social media shares and interactions etc.

We've done very well this year already. Cazoo will be delighted. Pretty sure we've already exceeded their expectations for this point in the year.

One thing they will know by now is that they will have to pay more to renew at the end of our agreement because that portfolio is going to look VERY attractive when we show it to other potential sponsors.
    

I'm only here for the cladding/Bramley Moore Dock updates


October 07, 2020, 02:49:42 AM
Reply #61
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Toddacelli


See also : on the spin.

On an unrelated note 'on the bounce' in local argot can also mean spoiling for a confrontation.

@YankeeBlue214

Also I don't know if it's used in Liverpool (I haven't lived there since I was a kid) but I also use the term "Let's bounce" for Let's go and the term "Gotta bounce" for when I've got to go.

I feel like they are American phrases that have made their way into British culture recently.
    

I'm only here for the cladding/Bramley Moore Dock updates

October 07, 2020, 03:16:46 AM
Reply #62
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YankeeBlue214

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@YankeeBlue214

Also I don't know if it's used in Liverpool (I haven't lived there since I was a kid) but I also use the term "Let's bounce" for Let's go and the term "Gotta bounce" for when I've got to go.

I feel like they are American phrases that have made their way into British culture recently.

We use 'bounce' to mean "I gotta be going" or "I'm outta here" pretty regularly.
NSNO's CGO. Chief GIF Officer (self-promoted).


October 07, 2020, 03:33:41 AM
Reply #63
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Brownie

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Down here ‘bouncing’ means good atmosphere, hyperactive, excited and is used to describe dropping someone as in ‘I had him bouncing all the way to the floor’.
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October 07, 2020, 03:34:44 AM
Reply #64
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Audrey Horne

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Down here ‘bouncing’ means good atmosphere, hyperactive, excited and is used to describe dropping someone as in ‘I had him bouncing all the way to the floor’.

same round here.
I have to return some videotapes.

Vamos lá Everton!

October 07, 2020, 03:36:27 AM
Reply #65
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Brownie

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same round here.

I love the fact that on such a relative small bit of land we have such a diverse use of the same words
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October 07, 2020, 03:52:57 AM
Reply #66
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Jimmywhack

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We should defo give Yankee a quiz on slang and terms
Simply simply lovely

October 07, 2020, 04:00:46 AM
Reply #67
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velimski


Yankee is a keen learner. I reckon he's been compiling his own list of British slang in a notebook over the last few months.

October 07, 2020, 04:03:17 AM
Reply #68
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Brownie

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Yankee is a keen learner. I reckon he's been compiling his own list of British slang in a notebook over the last few months.

Can we get a go fund me page going to finance a trip around the British Isles to see what he’s learnt and how he would adapt? Could film it as a documentary. Starts off in Scotland and makes his way around until he gets to Goodison for the finale.
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October 07, 2020, 04:06:11 AM
Reply #69
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Escla

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Can we get a go fund me page going to finance a trip around the British Isles to see what he’s learnt and how he would adapt? Could film it as a documentary. Starts off in Scotland and makes his way around until he gets to Goodison for the finale.

That would make a great documentary, in a post Covid world perhaps but for the time being he’s confined to New Jersey.

October 07, 2020, 04:08:00 AM
Reply #70
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Brownie

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That would make a great documentary, in a post Covid world perhaps but for the time being he’s confined to New Jersey.

Yankee goes where he likes, when he likes. #fuck Covid
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October 07, 2020, 12:07:51 PM
Reply #71
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Omar


To me, bounce means to leave. Like telling someone to “bounce, fool”. Or “I gotta bounce”
You come at the king, you best not miss.

October 07, 2020, 12:21:24 PM
Reply #72
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Goaljira

NSNO Subscriber
Can we get a go fund me page going to finance a trip around the British Isles to see what he’s learnt and how he would adapt? Could film it as a documentary. Starts off in Scotland and makes his way around until he gets to Goodison for the finale.

He could be the US Karl Pilkington.

October 07, 2020, 01:06:58 PM
Reply #73
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Old England Toffee


To me, bounce means to leave. Like telling someone to “bounce, fool”. Or “I gotta bounce”
you can also use bounce when talking about balls, e.g. the basketball man is doing a really good bounce, or shit im halfway through a long run and ive just realised I put the wrong undies on and now my balls are bouncing around, this is gonna cause swelling and not in a good way.

October 07, 2020, 01:17:17 PM
Reply #74
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bluenuck


Down here ‘bouncing’ means good atmosphere, hyperactive, excited and is used to describe dropping someone as in ‘I had him bouncing all the way to the floor’.

Same here in Canada... which is right next to Yankee Doodle doo.