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Author Topic: North Korea  (Read 2238 times)

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February 03, 2010, 04:39:01 PM
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fast lane


Not for the first time have they shown an interest in having Guus Hiddink as their coach for the coming World Cup.
The first time it was waved away, as Guus had not yet gotten over not going with Russia.
But this time his agent, Cees van Nieuwenhuizen is not saying no.
They're even enthousiastic in South Korea, even though the two countries are still officially at war.
Roman Abramovitch will have some say in the matter, as he pays Guus' Russian salary.
And Gazprom seem to be in the frame too.
Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)

February 03, 2010, 05:02:23 PM
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Major Clanger

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They always are.

Not an easy situation though. Normally North Korea should be isolated and shut out of the civilised world altogether. Except that their leaders don't give a fuck. Maybe smuggling the West in bit by bit until the regime falls apart is the way to go? (As it was proven to be effective in Eastern Europe.) Having said that, Gazprom isn't exactly the West either.
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February 04, 2010, 02:39:13 AM
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evertonjoe


Don't think Guus would go near there he seems much to sensible. Doesn't strike me as the sort to accept the tinkering with the team that Kim Jong-Il is alleged to insist upon. Apparently the tactics that got them to the world cup were divised by him (though I doubt that is true). I can't see this World Cup doing much for Western relations with N.Korea looking at there group they will probably be smashed in every match and I wouldn't put it past Kim Jong-Il to spin it as a Western conspiracy.

R.A.P Music


February 04, 2010, 05:31:45 AM
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Ridge


Don't think Guus would go near there he seems much to sensible. Doesn't strike me as the sort to accept the tinkering with the team that Kim Jong-Il is alleged to insist upon. Apparently the tactics that got them to the world cup were divised by him (though I doubt that is true). I can't see this World Cup doing much for Western relations with N.Korea looking at there group they will probably be smashed in every match and I wouldn't put it past Kim Jong-Il to spin it as a Western conspiracy.
He created football, nature and the long throw in, tactics wouldn't be too much of a push?

February 04, 2010, 06:23:41 AM
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Major Clanger

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He created football, nature and the long throw in, tactics wouldn't be too much of a push?

Lol, after Mao's Long March here's Kim's Long Throw. :)
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February 04, 2010, 02:05:46 PM
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fast lane


Don't know about his long throw in, but maybe the long arm of Gazprom has something to do with it.
I was surprized to read it, and expect nothing to come of it.
But you never know which other factors may play a part.
Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)


February 04, 2010, 07:09:49 PM
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toffee_scot


Not an easy situation though. Normally North Korea should be isolated and shut out of the civilised world altogether. Except that their leaders don't give a fuck. Maybe smuggling the West in bit by bit until the regime falls apart is the way to go? (As it was proven to be effective in Eastern Europe.) Having said that, Gazprom isn't exactly the West either.

For my International Relations dissertation at Uni I've been looking at how to deal with North Korea's pursuit of nuclear weapons and my argument is almost exactly the same as yours. George Bush and the neocons pursued a strategy of isolation and containment and 'North Korea is evil' rhetoric which gave Kim Jong-il an excuse to resume their plutonium weapons programme and test a nuclear bomb. The regime cannot be fully isolated anyway because China provides N Korea with material resources which then is distributed amongst the Korean People's Army and strengthens Kim Jong Il's position.

So by engaging with North Korea, by pursuing dialogue with them and building up trust and confidence in one another, it is possible that liberal ideas will penetrate more into the Stalinist state. Even in 2002 there were attempts at a limited market reform and they have pursued a joint economic venture with South Korea in the Kaesong district, so there is some evidence that N Korea is opening up but obviously they don't want the door to be too wide open because they won't cope with too much change. They will open up slowly. Maybe the 2010 World Cup will provide an occasion where N Korea moves itself out of isolation.

February 04, 2010, 09:16:47 PM
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fast lane


I think it's only a question of time before North and South Korea are to be united, when and how are unknown.
I know one has too many men, and the other the opposite, this may force them towards each other.
Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)

February 04, 2010, 09:58:41 PM
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Major Clanger

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For my International Relations dissertation at Uni I've been looking at how to deal with North Korea's pursuit of nuclear weapons and my argument is almost exactly the same as yours.

:thumbsup:

Good to hear that. I'm no expert in politics and even less so in the matters of North Korea, but I was born in a communist country and I witnessed the slow but steady disintegration of a regime.
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February 04, 2010, 11:27:14 PM
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toffee_scot


I think it's only a question of time before North and South Korea are to be united, when and how are unknown.
I know one has too many men, and the other the opposite, this may force them towards each other.


Its an interesting issue and it may happen one but but I can't see the Kim Jong-il regime collapse any time soon though, there are supposedly problems with his health and his youngest son has been selected as his successor. Perhaps his son might become the 'Gorbachev' of North Korea, we don't know. Both Koreas want reunifaction but under their own terms. Problem is both of them are so different it is amazing to think they are the same people. If reunifaction was achieved then the next problem is how do you tackle the North's economy to make it look more like the South and how do you de-Communise the people who have suffered more than half a century of intense indoctrination?