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Author Topic: Gueye Gana be great  (Read 44745 times)

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August 15, 2016, 07:30:49 PM
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van der Meyde


To be fair, in what world does Gana remind someone of Pienaar? They have none of the same skills, they are both short and black - only thing even close to being similar.
The way Gueye would position his body to win the ball, essentially coming round the side and sticking his arse into the opponent, was similar to how Pienaar and Arteta (and Barry) would win the ball and get free kicks.

Arteta and Barry might be a better comparison due to his position, but his industry and work rate was definitely most similar to Pienaar's in recent years.
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August 28, 2016, 03:44:09 AM
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van der Meyde


He always seems to be in the right place. I really can't work out how much of that is due to positioning or if he's just really quick.

At one point in the second half that when the ball was by their penalty box that he was hovering just in front of the centre circle, then quickly dropped back once it became clear they were going to launch the ball.

Was this something that was happening all game?
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August 28, 2016, 03:58:03 AM
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van der Meyde


Also being small he doesn't look like he's clumsily fouling the player on the ball. He's able  to battle away without giving cheap free kicks.

It might only be a couple of seconds but these delays really help us get in shape.
Said exactly the same to my dad.

I haven't been overly worried about deep crosses coming into the box because the defensive line has usually been organised and set. I suspect the hassling played a role in that.
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September 17, 2016, 07:09:40 PM
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van der Meyde


There are few words more British than "soccer", it's classic public school slang from the 19th century playing fields. c.f. "rugger".

"Half" as in "centrehalf" (but also left half and right half) comes from the classic English 2-3-5 system (the one before WM, it's also where the slightly odd numbering of shirts comes from.
Was reading something somewhere recently - possibly the book Soccernomics - that up until around the 1970s (when footy started getting a bit more popular in the US) the word soccer was about as popular, if not more so, than football in England. It was only from the 80s onwards that football became the predominant phrase.

Very much agree that calling half time "the half" is shabite though.
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