July 22, 2019, 01:26:28 AM

Author Topic: [News]Jo to go  (Read 6835 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

January 04, 2010, 06:31:02 PM
Reply #15
Offline

Jamokachi


The most unbrazilian brazilian I've ever seen.  Makes Lucas at the other shower look like Kaka.  Well rid, been an absolute disaster.

Still could have been worse, Moyes wanted to buy him b4 Shitty did :s

Don't talk through your arse.

And he'll be back imo, we need him. And he showed last year, he is capable og going on a scoring run. The football we've played this year has hrdly suited him, has it? If Arteta was hit, he'd have a hat-full, I'm sure of that. There's a player in there.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2010, 06:33:25 PM by Jamokachi »


January 04, 2010, 06:38:57 PM
Reply #16
Offline

Endless, Nameless


Don't talk through your arse.

And he'll be back imo, we need him. And he showed last year, he is capable og going on a scoring run. The football we've played this year has hrdly suited him, has it? If Arteta was hit, he'd have a hat-full, I'm sure of that. There's a player in there.

There's a player in there?? We don't have any more time for a player as bad as this. He's had so many chances this year and if there is a good player in him, he hasn't come out yet. Putting Jo in our starting XI is a waste of a place, even with all the injuries.
Oh well, at least Baines is still ace.

January 04, 2010, 06:45:48 PM
Reply #17
Offline

charlatan


Don't talk shite yourself.

If it was Osman that had been performing like Jo, the locals would have been burning effigies of him in the streets.  Jo is lazy uninterested shite, end of.


January 04, 2010, 07:20:47 PM
Reply #18
Offline

.Rimbo.


I've heard the same joke as you Risky, but with Lucas Leiva and David Blunkett.

January 04, 2010, 07:24:22 PM
Reply #19
Offline

Jamokachi


Lucas is a far worse player, and if he was playing in a blue shirt it'd be obvious, hence my reaction.

Jo may look lazy and uninterested, but with the complete lack of any sort of supply, who wouldn't? Ok, Saha has more goals, but he's a matured, top class finisher. Jo could be, one day, but he has a long way to go. The way Jo links up play is far better than Saha. I'd go as far a saying we play better as an attacking team with Jo in the side than Saha. Take the Liverpool game for example.

His main problem, or rather Evertonians problem with him - is he's not a grafter. He's very South American in that respect. He won't run around the pitch like a headless chicken, much like Yakubu. People have been on his back of late for being lazy, yet we all know just how good he is given the right type of service.

Give Jo service, he'll score goals. I also don't think he's suited to playing up front on his own. I'd like to see him play alongside a grafter such as Vaughan, in front of a decent midfield. If we send him packing to City we won't have such options, a situation we can ill affoard.

January 04, 2010, 07:53:36 PM
Reply #20
Online

GLewis

NSNO Subscriber
None of our 3 "senior" strikers put in loads of effort. That's why we usually play Cahill there as he basically does all the hard graft for them.

Saha and the Yak are excused most of the running as by and large they have scored at a very good rate, apart from his fisrt 10 games Jo hasn't.

Not that he's started loads of games since then mind, but people while excusing Vaughan's strike rate (rightly IMO) don't with Jo because he doesn't make loads of mad challenges.

As Jamo says, he links the play up far better than Saha but doesn't carry the same threat so it's hard to justify playing him.

He could be a very good player in the future, whether he will or not will depends on how his attitude and all round game develops with time. But given that he's 22 he's got plenty of time to see if it does.

I'm not particularly bothered if he stays, providing that we get someone in, but he's not useless like some people think.


January 04, 2010, 08:48:42 PM
Reply #21
Offline

Ong-Timus Prime



Stolen from Tim Vickery's blog on the BBC  :evil:

Home comforts strain ties with clubs
Tim Vickery | 11:52 UK time, Monday, 4 January 2010

Jo's one-man introduction of a winter break into the English calendar by returning to South America without permission over the Christmas period is not a good sign at all. It sends out a bad message - that Everton's Brazilian striker has fallen off the tightrope.

It's arguable that we are seeing more such acts of inconsistency from players than ever before at the top level of the game, and I am convinced this is no coincidence. On the one hand, football's athletic development and the crowded fixture list mean that the physical and, probably, mental demands are greater than ever.

But on the other hand, so are the rewards. After two years with a major club, a player need never work again. He is surrounded by temptations. Doors open which he never even knew existed when he was a kid. Why bother with all those sacrifices?

Perhaps Ronaldinho is the most glaring recent example. Though there are signs of a recovery this season, he has been a shadow of himself for three years. The talent has all been there but not the acceleration that gave him space to use it. It points to off-the-field excesses and the fact that he, perhaps, is reaching an age at which his body needs more recovery time.

The difference, of course, is that Ronaldinho was on fire for three or four years. He has scaled the mountain. Jo is still gaining a foothold. He's a 22-year-old striker of undoubted promise. But leaving his club in the lurch would seem to indicate that he is happy with what he has achieved and is not prepared to pay the price needed to move up to the next level.

A decade ago, when Premier League clubs started importing South Americans, they were frequently guilty of buying the player and forgetting the human being. Outside training time, they would leave their expensive acquisition entirely to his own devices, in an alien culture, with no idea of how to solve day-to-day problems.

A few months back, I interviewed Colombian striker Juan Pablo Angel on this very subject. He was proud to see himself as a pioneer. Aston Villa signed him and then left him on his own to sort out a problem with his wife's health. But during the course of his spell in the West Midlands, things became much more professional, with welfare officers appointed to help the players. English clubs are clearly doing something right in this regard. Wigan, for example, have managed to get excellent performances from players from Ecuador and Honduras, countries with little tradition of exporting to Europe.

I wonder, though - and this is speculation rather than criticism - if there is one area where more could still be done: that of forging an emotional link between the player and the club.

It is sometimes said that some Brazilians play for their European club for money and represent their national team for love. There is something in this. Players who may have disappointed English supporters with their attitude, such as Elano and Robinho, are quite happy to knuckle down and make a useful contribution when they pull on the yellow shirt.

But if they can do it for their country, then why not for their club? There are obstacles to be overcome here. When they play for Brazil, they have a very clear idea of who they are representing. But with their clubs, this is more complicated.

I read recently Sir Bobby Charlton's autobiography 'My Manchester United Years' and was struck by the strong sense he had, drilled into the team by Matt Busby, that United were representing the people of the world's first industrial city. This was part of the entire ethos of the club.

So much has changed. Previously, a city's identity was tied up with what it produced. This has weakened with the loss of so much manufacturing. In fact, I would argue that part of the explanation for the extraordinary popularity of football in the United Kingdom is that it offers people a chance, in a sanitised environment, to maintain contact with the collective values of the industrial age. But the factories have closed and the clubs have become global brands. United, for example, have more fans in Asia than in all the other continents combined. So the question of who the clubs represent is not so clear.

And, of course, the players have changed since Charlton's day. The amount they earn limits their contact with ordinary fans, and nowadays the players come from all over the world. The advance of technology means that, for example, a Brazilian can play for an English club but watch nothing but Brazilian TV and keep in constant contact with his mates back home. He can be in one place physically yet his mind be in another. As recently as 15 years ago, a player was almost obliged to integrate. Now he can exist in his own little Brazil.

This is what the clubs are up against - players who earn so much that motivation is not guaranteed and who are increasingly likely to feel no emotional connection to the institution they belong.

I recently saw Portugal boss Carlos Queiroz give a lecture to Brazilian coaches on the demands of working in different continents. He stressed the importance of a coach immersing himself in the history of his club and told the story of his time in charge of Sporting Lisbon when he took the squad to the club museum. They regarded it as a punishment, he said, but they had to go.

This kind of initiative is increasingly important. Manchester United twins Fabio and Rafael da Silva were recently on Brazilian TV saying that Manchester is a terrible place for going out. Do they really not know anything of the city's giant contribution to global popular culture? The club should be telling them. They should know who and what they are representing.

Making players aware of the cultural context can be almost as important as work on the training ground. Jo should be so immersed in Everton culture that he'll be sick at the sight of another toffee. Because by jumping ship in search of some sunshine during the festive period, he has not just let down his manager, team-mates and the fans. He has let down everyone who has helped build the institution since 1878.

if you know yer history...

January 05, 2010, 12:07:26 AM
Reply #22
Offline

brazilian_blue4life


great article imo... i fully agree with all, thats the problem with the financial football of nowdays....

January 05, 2010, 12:12:11 AM
Reply #23
Offline

DannyR


Jo is a worse brazillian since david blunkett shaved his girlfreind

January 05, 2010, 12:21:29 AM
Reply #24
Offline

Endless, Nameless


Jo is a worse brazillian since david blunkett shaved his girlfreind

Too late. But still true.
Oh well, at least Baines is still ace.

January 05, 2010, 01:03:56 AM
Reply #25
Offline

toffee_scot


I wonder how long this Jo saga will continue, there is a possibility that in a few weeks time he will still be at Everton and Moyes will have moved on, or, perhaps Everton will have finally persuaded Man City to have their player back.

January 08, 2010, 04:50:29 PM
Reply #26
Online

DanDan

NSNO Subscriber
Everton's on-loan striker Jo will return to training on Monday.

The Brazilian had been suspended by the Club after he returned to his homeland without permission from manager David Moyes.

Jo won't feature at Arsenal this weekend but will be back at Finch Farm next week.

Moyes also revealed that the player had been fined for his conduct.
......

January 08, 2010, 05:02:53 PM
Reply #27
Offline

Jamokachi


Everton's on-loan striker Jo will return to training on Monday.

The Brazilian had been suspended by the Club after he returned to his homeland without permission from manager David Moyes.

Jo won't feature at Arsenal this weekend but will be back at Finch Farm next week.

Moyes also revealed that the player had been fined for his conduct.

Just like what moyes did with the Yak. If he gets his head down in training he'll be given a chance.

January 08, 2010, 05:03:23 PM
Reply #28
Offline

blargins

NSNO Subscriber
I agree with Jamo on this. His link up play is so much better than Saha's who tends to hog the ball too much. The difference is Saha can get you a goal out of nothing, whereas Jo, so far can't.

Our long ball style of play doesn't help Jo either, plus, he has stated in the past, he isn't an out and out striker, more of a second striker, and I don't recall too many games where he's had the luxury of playing up front with another striker. Moyes doesn't do that often.

I'm glad he'll be back in training next week, and I hope this suspension has been the kick up the backside he needs, and the second half of the season will be more fruitful for him.
“The best way to not feel hopeless is to get up and do something. Don’t wait for good things to happen to you. If you go out and make some good things happen, you will fill the world with hope, you will fill yourself with hope.” Barack Obama

January 08, 2010, 05:29:28 PM
Reply #29
Offline

Endless, Nameless


Oh well, at least Baines is still ace.