November 23, 2017, 11:53:14 AM

Author Topic: Football and dementia  (Read 329 times)

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November 11, 2017, 04:03:29 AM
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Major Clanger


It's not often that I'm looking forward to seeing Alan Shearer on screen, but this might be genuinely interesting.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/41902953
The Shadow Over Inasmuch - The Adventures of Bicoid, Hunchback and Kruppel

November 15, 2017, 02:23:43 PM
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Toddacelli


Anyone watch this?

Any good?
    

I'm only here for the cladding/Bramley Moore Dock updates

November 16, 2017, 05:47:21 PM
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Goaljira

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Anyone watch this?

Any good?

I forgot it was on.  Will check iplayer.
Cordiali saluti, motherfuckers.


November 16, 2017, 05:55:49 PM
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Major Clanger


Anyone watch this?

Any good?

It was a bit lean on content for me, but what it did contain was good. He was asking the right questions too.
The Shadow Over Inasmuch - The Adventures of Bicoid, Hunchback and Kruppel

November 17, 2017, 07:49:20 PM
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Jimmywhack

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Scored a bullet header last Saturday, this makes me wish I hadn't bothered


Simply simply lovely

November 17, 2017, 07:55:12 PM
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ally2


I'd rather wait for some proper research. Most of these sorts of documentaries are painfully slow, weak on content, and strong on sentimentality.  It might raised awareness but to who?  Your average football fan won't give a shit, and the powers that be have too much money to lose so they'll quash hearsay and discredit medical opinion. The only way to break the status quo is more research.  Balls are lighter already.


November 17, 2017, 08:15:04 PM
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Major Clanger


I'd rather wait for some proper research. Most of these sorts of documentaries are painfully slow, weak on content, and strong on sentimentality.  It might raised awareness but to who?  Your average football fan won't give a shit, and the powers that be have too much money to lose so they'll quash hearsay and discredit medical opinion. The only way to break the status quo is more research.  Balls are lighter already.

I think that was the conclusion of the documentary too. And it was good to see that independent research is being conducted into this, regardless of football authorities' reluctance to fund it.

(Also fun fact from the documentary, balls are not lighter at all. They are more waterproof, so they don't get soggy and heavy when wet, but in the dry they're about the same weight.)
« Last Edit: November 17, 2017, 08:16:14 PM by Major Clanger »
The Shadow Over Inasmuch - The Adventures of Bicoid, Hunchback and Kruppel

November 20, 2017, 10:21:40 PM
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Shropshire Blue

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Watched this on catchup last night.
Two things struck me. Firstly, credit to Shearer who handled it well and had some bottle to take the MRI scan and see if he was affected. Not sure I'd want to know at such an early age!
Secondly over needing more research. Until that is available I'm not sure I'd be comfortable letting my kids head a ball as much now 'as it MIGHT be all right'. Didn't stop them when they were younger but didn't encourage it either having seen the effect of dementia and the consequences of continual head trauma.
Desperate need for commitment to research from all involved,
.
The Himalayas has the Yeti, Norway has Trolls, America has Hillbillies. You, good people, are blessed with Shropshire.

November 21, 2017, 01:16:52 AM
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Mayor Farnum


A friend of mine is the official statistican for Southport Football Club. About twenty years ago he wrote a book that interviewed every surviving player that had played league football for Southport. He went all round the world meeting ex players who had mainly played in the 1960s and early 70s.
He remarked back then how many of them were either living in care homes or were being cared for by relatives. Mainly because of forms of dementia. It was by no means a scientific study but my friend reckons more than half of the men he met were mentally impaired to varying degrees.